If you live in a stone house. . .

I’m already used to the teeny-tiny hoses that drip precious water onto the roots of plants here in the West. No Rain-Bird (TM) whoosing across the whole lawn for us.

drip irrigation for natal plum bush

Drip irrigation for natal plum bush

We ooze out water on timers, delivered directly into the plant very early in the morning. No wasting precious resources for us. We don’t have them to waste. You can see the hoses, skinny as a pencil, connected to the water pipe in the picture on the left.

I’ve even gotten used to seeing aloes and natal plums (fussy houseplants in the East) growing in front- and back yards.

Aloes under the fig tree

Aloes under the fig tree

This house, however, is a totally new architechtural view for me. The eaves of some houses here are done in stone. At first I thought it was Formstone, the faux-stone outdoor covering made popular in the 1930s row houses of urban neighborhoods in the East. Baltimore has some fabulous examples of Formstone.

This is different. Real stone, set into the eaves as decoration. Interesting, although I’m glad I didn’t have to lift them up there and cement them into place.

Stone eaves, house circa 1980, Arizona

Stone eaves, house circa 1980, Arizona

–Quinn McDonald is a writer and certified creativity coach loving every minute of her new life in the West.